Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau dead at 89 - ShadowTV | Online News Media 24/7 | The Shadow Behind the Truths!

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Oscar-winning actor Martin Landau dead at 89

Martin Landau, a capable and productive character performing artist who accomplished TV fame in "Mission: Impossible" and won an Oscar for his depiction of a cleaned up Bela Lugosi in the sweetly peculiar 1994 film "Ed Wood," has kicked the bucket at age 89. Landau kicked the bucket at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles on Saturday from sudden inconveniences amid a short hospitalization for an undisclosed ailment, marketing expert Dick Guttman said in an announcement on Sunday. 

His long vocation had astounding high points and low points. He conveyed acclaimed exhibitions in motion pictures by top chiefs including Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen and Tim Burton, was assigned three times for Oscars, and co-featured in the spy arrangement "Mission: Impossible" in the 1960s nearby then-spouse Barbara Bain. 

In any case, amid vocation doldrums, the New York-conceived Landau grieved in third-rate activities, for example, the funny 1981 TV film "The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island" and the nonessential 1983 mutant creature motion picture "The Being." 

"You know, I've generally felt, pound for pound, I'm one of the best folks around; however you stall out in individuals' eyes unquestionably, and it takes an inventive chief who will take a gander at you and acknowledge you can play various types of parts since you are a performing artist," Landau told the New York Times in 1988. "I don't care to sound bold however I have confidence in what I can do." 

Landau was named best supporting on-screen character for his depiction in "Ed Wood" of the blurring, morphine-dependent Hungarian horrormeister Lugosi, star of "Dracula." The peculiar thrown in Burton's praise to mythical terrible motion picture chief Wood included Johnny Depp, Bill Murray, Sarah Jessica Parker and wrestler George "The Animal" Steele. 

"It's difficult to overestimate the occupation that Landau does here as this sepulchral Hungarian," Washington Post faultfinder Hal Hinson wrote in his audit of the 1994 film. "Both vocally and physically, he's essentially astonishing." After winning the Oscar in March 1995, Landau spouted: "My God! What a night. What an existence. What a minute. What everything!" 

The tall, slender Landau additionally was named for Oscars as best supporting on-screen character for his part as a visionary carmaker's accomplice in Coppola's 1988 "Tucker: The Man and His Dream" – the part that restored his vocation – and as a man who slaughters his special lady in Allen's 1989 "Violations and Misdemeanors." 

NOT MR. SPOCK 

Landau likewise is associated with a part he didn't get. He was "Star Trek" maker Gene Roddenberry's first pick to depict pointy-eared Vulcan Mr. Spock, a notable part that in the end went to Leonard Nimoy. 

Nimoy at that point supplanted Landau on "Mission: Impossible" when he exited in a pay question. Landau was companions in the 1950s with screen legends James Dean and Steve McQueen and concentrated under celebrated around the world "technique acting" defender Lee Strasberg. His vocation included assorted parts in movies, TV and organize was all the while going solid in the 2010s. 



At a very early stage in his profession, he established a connection with a despicable hand over chief Alfred Hitchcock's great 1959 thriller "North by Northwest." His character, a partner in crime who threats star Cary Grant, meets his destruction underneath the Mount Rushmore busts of US presidents. 

It was the part of ace of mask Rollin Hand on "Mission: Impossible" that pushed Landau to fame. He was hitched to co-star Bain from 1957 until their separation in 1993. In 1968, Landau took the Golden Globe grant as best male TV star. 

He likewise co-featured with Bain in the 1970s science fiction arrangement "Space: 1999" and showed up in Rod Serling's acclaimed arrangement "The Twilight Zone." In 2011, he loaned his voice to a scene of the respected enlivened arrangement "The Simpsons."

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